Effective Code Reviews

Effective Code Reviews

On my way of finding a podcast for my first assignment, I passed by this podcast about Code Review. I decided to choose it for my first blog entry because it had some interesting opinions about code reviews. By listening to this, I learned about other benefits of code reviews, beside bugs detection and code improvement. Below was the link of the podcast:

https://talkpython.fm/episodes/show/102/effective-code-reviews.

In this podcast hosted by Michael Kennedy, Dougal Matthews shared his thoughts and experience about the benefits of code reviews and the elements effective code reviews should have. Dougal gave an interesting scenario that code reviews could save the day. For example, there were two persons, one knew more about C++, one knew more about Python. Even though they might not understand deeply what the other person is doing, they should have a code review with lighter level in case that one of them was ill or left the company. He also brought up one of the reason he thought that many people did not like doing code reviews. They expected bugs detection for their codes, but they usually received code improvement more than bugs for their valid codes. Michael and Dougal also had some interesting ideas for an effective code reviews.

To be honest, I haven’t thought that code reviews could be used as a tool to back-up basic information of a project like Dougal mentioned. Usually, the first thing that came to my mind when hearing code reviews would be bugs detection. But his scenario pointed out a special case, which some small groups might have, that code reviews could help fixing it.

About one of the reasons many people did not like doing code reviews, I understood their feelings when they just wanted to test if their codes had bugs or not, not to re-do the whole project again just because they received a better solution to solve their problems. But I thought that we should be more flexible about that. If we had another solution, which was better than our original one in one or many ways, then we should choose that solution. Beside improving the code, we also gained experience from it. The next time we countered something that was similar, we could jump directly to the better solution and reduce the time we might spend for the worse solutions that we had used before.

I thought that the code review checklist which was mentioned by Michael and Dougal would be very helpful. Like they said, it kept the reviewers and the developers on the same page. This certainly reduced the time everyone spending to ask around the same question about the progress. I also agreed with their idea about having more than one people doing code review for a same project. Different people had different points of view, and people might make mistakes. By having more people involved in the reviewing process, we could increase the quality of the review, and share our knowledge to each other.

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